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11. Microsoft Is Leaving

Microsoft was one of the Consumer Electronics Show’s biggest draws. Each year, it would kick off the event and set the tone for the rest of the week. But now that Microsoft is leaving, what can the CEA do to attract a Microsoft-like company? Chances are, very little.

22. Where’s Apple?

Apple has stayed away from CES, realizing that it’s probably not the best place for the company to promote its products. If Apple was at the event and announced something major, it could save CES. But the chances of Apple coming to CES are, well, zero.

33. Google Doesn’t Seem to Care Much

Google might be a prime candidate to carry the CES leadership banner after Microsoft goes. However, the search company isn’t invested in consumer hardware, leaving that to its vendor partners. So, while Google may present at the show, there’s little chance it’ll impress many folks.

44. Too Many Companies

When one heads to CES to see what’s on display, they’ll quickly find that it’s too hard to see everything. Each year, CES is with companies from around the globe, making it impossible to talk to everyone and see all the products that deserve attention. CES is becoming bloated and unproductive because of it.

54. Too Many Companies

When one heads to CES to see what’s on display, they’ll quickly find that it’s too hard to see everything. Each year, CES is with companies from around the globe, making it impossible to talk to everyone and see all the products that deserve attention. CES is becoming bloated and unproductive because of it.

66. Little Attention Is Paid to the Good Stuff

As noted, there are simply too many companies at CES. What that creates, however, is a scenario where the really good stuff can be overlooked. So, in many cases, companies fail to deliver their top products, realizing quickly that those devices might get lost in the shuffle. It’s a real issue that’s hurting CES.

77. The Practical Is Sometimes Tossed Aside

One of the easiest ways to get attention at CES is to deliver something very futuristic or unique. The only issue is, in most cases, those products are not practical implementations, and therefore, won’t make it to store shelves. In recent years, more practical solutions have been ignored in favor of hopeful products. It’s rather unfortunate.

88. Companies Are Seeing Value At Other Events

CES isn’t the only consumer electronics show held each year. In fact, Microsoft typically makes a splash at the E3 Gaming Expo each summer. And several other firms see quite a bit of value at other, smaller events. And chances are, they’re only going to continue to attend those events more and more in the coming years.

99. Big Announcements Are Saved For Other Events

As more and more companies see that their products aren’t getting the kind of attention they’d like, they’re going to increasingly turn to other events to make their big announcements. As noted, it’s already happening with Microsoft, Google, Apple, and countless other prominent firms, and it’s starting to appeal to smaller firms. Without big announcements, CES is in trouble

1010. Where’s the Buzz?

The buzz surrounding CES over the last couple years has been quite odd. Previously, the discussions focused on what companies might offer. But over the last couple years, those discussions have centered on firms that aren’t showing and issues CEA is having running the show. The buzz is almost gone. And when the buzz goes, the show goes.