Millennials Show New Interest in Security Careers

 
 
By Gina Roos  |  Posted 2016-10-26 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    1 - Millennials Show New Interest in Security Careers
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    Millennials Show New Interest in Security Careers

    A Raytheon-NCSA survey of young adults in 12 countries shows significant interest in cyber-security careers and preparedness. The results varied by gender.
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    2 - Growing Awareness
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    Growing Awareness

    The number of young adults in the U.S. who have read or heard a news account of cyber-attacks within the last year jumped from 36% in 2015 to 64% in 2016. Globally, the percentage rose from 33% to 48%.
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    3 - Candidate Viewpoints
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    Candidate Viewpoints

    53% of young adults in the U.S. said a political candidate's position on cyber-security affects their level of support for that candidate.
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    4 - Cyber-Security Discussion in the Election
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    Cyber-Security Discussion in the Election

    50% of young adults in the U.S. don't think cyber-security has been a big enough part of the discussion leading up to the presidential election.
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    5 - Understanding Cyber-Security
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    Understanding Cyber-Security

    Globally, the number of millennials who said they were aware of what a cyber pro's job entails rose from 39% in 2015 to 45% in 2016.
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    6 - Gender Gap
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    Gender Gap

    The gender gap widened. While 54% of young men understood the cyber-security profession (up from 45% in 2015), only 36% of young women did (up from 33% in 2015).
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    7 - Cyber Competitions
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    Cyber Competitions

    More than a third (36%) of respondents were aware of cyber competitions at their schools. Yet, while 42% of men were aware of the contests, only 29% of women were.
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    8 - Incentive Programs
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    Incentive Programs

    70% of millennials in the U.S. said cyber-security programs or activities are available to them, up from 57% in 2015. Globally, the percentage rose from 54% to 68%.
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    9 - Lack of Opportunities
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    Lack of Opportunities

    Women (38%) are more likely to believe than men (25%) that they have no cyber activities available to them. Together, 33% of millennials in the U.S. have sought out cyber-security activities, compared with 45% globally.
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    10 - Choosing Cyber-Security Careers
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    Choosing Cyber-Security Careers

    43% of men and 30% of women said they were more likely to choose a cyber-security career, compared with 33% of men and 24% of women a year ago.
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    11 - What Sparks Millennials' Interest in Cyber-Security Careers?
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    What Sparks Millennials' Interest in Cyber-Security Careers?

    48% of millennials said more information about what the jobs might entail would increase their interest in cyber-security careers, followed by more relevant training to see if they would be good at it (44%), speaking with current professionals (37%) and reassurance that they would earn a good living (34%).
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    12 - Cyber Safety Lessons
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    Cyber Safety Lessons

    Globally, 59% of men, up from 43% in 2015, reported receiving formal cyber safety lessons in 2016, compared to 51% of women, up from 40% a year ago.
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    13 - Types of Skills
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    Types of Skills

    Millennials want jobs applying skills cyber professionals use: 56% said they were interested in problem-solving, followed by data analysis (42%), programming (28%), management (49%) and communications (54%).
 

If there is one bright spot in the run-up to the U.S. presidential election, it's the increased interest in cyber-security careers among millennials. This is thanks partly to nearly daily news reports over the past few months about Russian cyber-attacks and leaks of the Democratic Party's private emails. A global survey, commissioned by Raytheon and the National Cyber Security Alliance, reports the number of young adults who have read or heard a news account of cyber-attacks has doubled in the past year. The report finds that growing awareness and increased interest in cyber-security has been driven by initiatives such as cyber competitions in school and cyber safety education. But there is more work to be done particularly in outreach to females. The gender gap exists and appears to be getting worse, which can have an impact on talent recruitment. The survey shows progress in the overall outreach to young adults but also indicates that industry and business leaders, along with educators and parents, need to do a better job of communicating about opportunities in the cyber-security field, particularly for young females. Channel Insider examines key study findings.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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