Why the Skills Gap in IT Security Might Get Wider

 
 
By Gina Roos  |  Posted 2015-11-19 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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    1 - Why the Skills Gap in IT Security Might Get Wider
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    Why the Skills Gap in IT Security Might Get Wider

    Schools aren't adequately preparing young adults, particularly females in that age group, to pursue cyber-security careers, new research shows.
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    2 - Knowledge Gap
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    Knowledge Gap

    Globally, 47% of men say they are aware of the job responsibilities involved in cyber-security careers, compared with only 33% of women. In the U.S., the gap is larger: 51% of men and 33% of women know what a cyber-security career entails.
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    3 - No Guidance
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    No Guidance

    Globally, 62% of men and 75% of women said no secondary or high school computer classes offered the skills to help them pursue a cyber-security career. In the U.S., 57% of men and 74% of women said schools did not offer the skills needed.
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    4 - Low Awareness
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    Low Awareness

    Globally, 57% of men and 66% of women said no teacher or career counselor mentioned cyber-security as a career. In the U.S., 55% of men, versus 69% of women said teachers and career counselors never mentioned cyber-security as a career.
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    5 - No Qualifications
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    No Qualifications

    Globally, 25% of women and 23% of men said they haven’t sought out cyber-security programs because they did not think they were qualified. In the U.S., 33% of women felt they were not qualified versus 24% of men.
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    6 - Career Choices
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    Career Choices

    Globally, men are more likely (33%) than women (24%) to consider cyber-security as a career than they were a year ago. In the U.S., the gap is wider, with 40% of men and 23% of women choosing security as a career.
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    7 - Gender Gap Widens
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    Gender Gap Widens

    The gap between U.S. young men and women who would consider a career in Internet security is five times what it was a year ago.
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    8 - Lack of Programs
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    Lack of Programs

    Globally, 52% of women and 39% of men said no cyber-security programs or activities were available to them.
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    9 - Bright Spot
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    Bright Spot

    28% of young adults globally are more likely to choose a career in cyber-security versus one year ago, while 16% are less likely.
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    10 - No Interest
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    No Interest

    Of those who are less likely to pursue cyber-security jobs, 25% of females and 17% of males cited a lack of interest as the reason. In the U.S., the gap is higher: 36% of females, versus 12% of males.
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    11 - Making a Difference or Making Money
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    Making a Difference or Making Money

    50% of global respondents said believing in their employers' missions is important to them, and 63% said salary is important.
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    12 - More Info Needed
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    More Info Needed

    38% of millennials globally and 41% of millennials in the U.S. would like more information on what a cyber-security career entails.
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    13 - Preconceived Barriers
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    Preconceived Barriers

    Global respondents cited stress (21%) and the futility of fighting inevitable cyber-attacks (21%) as downsides of cyber-security careers. Other negatives included boring job tasks (18%) and inadequate salaries (15%).
 

Despite growing demand for cyber-security professionals, a global survey of 3,871 young adults indicates a significant talent gap ahead. The survey, commissioned by Raytheon and the National Cyber Security Alliance, uncovers some startling news that could spell trouble for businesses seeking talent to keep their companies safe from cyber-attacks. The annual study, Securing Our Future: Closing the Cyber Talent Gap, indicates that schools are not preparing young adults for cyber-security jobs, and the gap is even wider when it comes to females being informed about careers in the field. These findings are a wake-up call for needed collaboration among businesses, the government and education. "There will be serious implications for the world's security, safety and economic stability if we don't figure out how to foster a cyber-security workforce capable of protecting our information from increasingly harmful cyber-threats," said Jack Harrington, vice president of cyber-security and special missions for Raytheon's Intelligence, Information and Services business. Here are 12 reasons businesses should worry about a lack of security talent.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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