RIM PlayBook to Support Two More High-Speed Network Standards

By Reuters  |  Posted 2011-02-14 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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RIM says that the PlayBook tablet computer will be available in LTE and HSPA+ versions later this year, a move which opens the tablet to all major carriers in North America.

(Reuters) - Research In Motion, maker of the BlackBerry smartphone, will release its PlayBook tablet computer on two more high-speed network standards in the second half of 2011, the company said on Monday.

The move to offer LTE and HSPA+ versions of its PlayBook guarantees access the most advanced wireless data networks in the world, including all major carriers in North America.

The first version of the PlayBook, with WiFi and Bluetooth but no cellular connection, is set for launch in March and U.S. carrier Sprint Nextel will sell a version for its WiMAX network in the summer.

The WiFi-only version can connect to a user's existing BlackBerry smartphone to access its data and use its wireless connection, but that may give carriers little incentive to subsidize or advertise the PlayBook aggressively.

Evolved High Speed Packet Access (HSPA+) is used by AT&T and T-Mobile in the United States and Rogers, BCE Inc and Telus in Canada. Long Term Evolution (LTE) is an all-IP standard that Verizon Wireless, among others, has started to deploy.

Both standards are designed to carry the increased amount of data needed for video streaming and large file downloads at improved speeds.

RIM also said on Monday it has bought Seattle-based business social networking company Gist for an undisclosed sum, as it seeks to bolster its position versus Apple, Google's Android, and the newly announced combination of Nokia and Microsoft in the fiercely competitive mobile telecoms market.

RIM also said its App World online store is now available in 27 more countries for a total of 101 and now has more than 20,000 applications on offer.

The Waterloo, Ontario-based company has struggled to compete with the consumer-focused app offerings of Apple's App Store and Google's Android Marketplace.

Shares in RIM, which announced the PlayBook in late September, have jumped almost 50 percent since early that month. They were down 1.1 percent at C$65.16 on Monday afternoon.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
























 
 
 
 
 
 

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