Microsoft Posts How-To on Working with RSS in Vista

By Lisa Vaas  |  Posted 2005-08-05 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Microsoft has posted the first installment of a blog to advise developers on creating Web pages and RSS feeds that work correctly with IE 7 and Windows Vista.

Microsoft on Wednesday posted the first installment of a blog to advise developers on creating Web pages and RSS feeds that work correctly with IE 7 and Windows Vista.

Microsoft plans to provide a common feed list of subscriptions and a common feed store of data in Vista, the Windows client release formerly known as Longhorn. The capabilities will be available to applications through Windows APIs.

The company also plans to let users automatically discover and subscribe to feeds in Internet Explorer 7. That feature is already available in competing browsers, including Mozilla Firefox and Apple Computer Inc.'s Safari.

RSS will be available in both IE 7 for Windows XP Service Pack 2 and for Windows' upcoming Longhorn server, which as yet hasn't received its final name. Microsoft released a beta of IE 7 last week. The beta for the Longhorn server is due later this summer. Microsoft plans to release the Longhorn RSS APIs during the Professional Developers Conference in September.

The advisory page, available here, is a work in progress that will be updated as Microsoft nears completion of Vista. Microsoft released a beta of Vista last week, and the final product is expected late next year.

Read the rest of this eWEEK story: "Microsoft Posts How-To on Working with RSS in Vista"

 
 
 
 
Lisa Vaas is News Editor/Operations for eWEEK.com and also serves as editor of the Database topic center. Since 1995, she has also been a Webcast news show anchorperson and a reporter covering the IT industry. She has focused on customer relationship management technology, IT salaries and careers, effects of the H1-B visa on the technology workforce, wireless technology, security, and, most recently, databases and the technologies that touch upon them. Her articles have appeared in eWEEK's print edition, on eWEEK.com, and in the startup IT magazine PC Connection. Prior to becoming a journalist, Vaas experienced an array of eye-opening careers, including driving a cab in Boston, photographing cranky babies in shopping malls, selling cameras, typography and computer training. She stopped a hair short of finishing an M.A. in English at the University of Massachusetts in Boston. She earned a B.S. in Communications from Emerson College. She runs two open-mic reading series in Boston and currently keeps bees in her home in Mashpee, Mass.
 
 
 
 
 
























 
 
 
 
 
 

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