Job Market Crisis: Disappointed IT Job Seekers

By Channel Insider Staff  |  Posted 2008-09-14 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Many IT job seekers say the so-called talent shortage is a myth. The following comments were posted by job seekers for positions at IT vendors and solution providers. They have been only slightly edited for publication.

  • I don't think companies want you to apply. When they get a few dozen rejections, they get an H1-B Visa employee by saying "we can't get anyone in the U.S. to take the job."

  • Well, talent shortage is a myth. There is, however, a shortage of companies who a willing to pay for talent. Nothing in this world is free, and if a recruiter calls me and says "company XYZ is offering $50,000 for a senior storage engineer with extensive experience with UNIX and clustering," then all I can do is laugh out loud and tell the recruiter to tell company XYZ to stop dreaming.

  • Employers want to world and want it for free: I've been a senior developer and webmaster for over eight years. While working for a company I was let go simply because the company and more specifically, the CFO, found that he could save my salary (six-digits) by outsourcing to a company in Virginia. My experience is that most companies will ask for the world (certifications) without really knowing what they really need, and expect to get it at a bargain. The truth is that in today's global market companies don't care what you know even if you have what they're looking for. What matters to them is what you will cost them.

  • Anyone with real talent in IT actually works in IT. That's what happens to your "talented channel sales" folks: they get sick of pitching the hot-channel-item-of-the-day and go back to what they got into the business for in the first place. In my experience, most channel sales people would be just as knowledgeable selling washing machines or used cars as they are in providing solutions that actually work in the industry.

  • Despite this poor business management, executive management continues to collect their perks/bonuses. I am not alone. Many in the business are tired of this revolving churn. Until the atmosphere is healthier, investment in people is perceived as a long term commitment to their company and the customer, I don't see the crisis getting better.

Read More Feedback on the IT Talent Crisis
•    Frustrated Hiring Managers
•    Undervalued Salespeople
•    Ignorant Human Resources
•    Trouble with Training
•    Laughably Low Pay & Salaries
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
























 
 
 
 
 
 

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