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  • The biggest challenge with mobility may not be the technology, but rather the impact it has on how solution providers deliver support.

  • IBM continues to build up its SoftLayer cloud, helping channel partners improve margins and adding security and disaster recovery to the platform.

  • The channel is changing. There was a time when VARs were heavily focused on companies like Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard, Dell, Cisco and IBM. But with the advent of consumer-focused product launches, the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) phenomena and the fact that IT has, in some ways, less clout than it once did, everything has changed. Now, in addition to those firms, Apple has become a contender in the enterprise, and the channel is wondering how that will affect the services it can provide clients. Despite the inherent concern with Apple products affecting the channel, the truth is that VARs should trust the Cupertino, Calif.-based company. With help from BYOD and solid ideas on how the enterprise can be positively affected by its products, Apple has shown that the channel can and perhaps should trust the iPhone maker. Apple products can benefit both the enterprise and the channel. Flip through the following slides to find out why Apple could benefit VARs and the enterprise, and why the company's slate of products can, and should, be trusted by the channel.

  • Microsoft Word and Internet Explorer get attention in this month's Patch Tuesday update, but some unpatched flaws remain.

  • Like it or not, we live in a world where nothing is as safe as it once was. That new security reality has been driving a significant increase in the deployment of video surveillance systems to corporate networks. A new survey, conducted by Enterprise Strategy Group on behalf of video equipment and services provider Axis Communications, finds that IT organizations in North America are playing a major role in selecting video surveillance systems. In addition, because those systems are connected to the network, there is a marked increase in the need for more bandwidth and storage. Demand is also growing for analytics and business intelligence (BI) applications that help customers identify patterns within all the video footage. In short, increased use of video surveillance systems is driving a range of downstream business opportunities channel providers can tap that now go well beyond attaching a few cameras to the side of buildings. Channel Insider examines key takeaways from the Axis Communications report.

  • One of the biggest challenges with selling IT security products is that many IT organizations do little more than deploy a firewall and antivirus software. One reason is that the first-generation of more advanced security technologies such as security information event management (SIEM) is difficult to deploy and manage. But a new survey of 268 IT professionals conducted by EiQ Networks, a provider of security intelligence platforms, finds that IT professionals have never been more worried about security. Their concerns create a climate that is ripe for solution providers across the channel to deliver next-generation threat protection and response systems that take the whole SIEM concept to a higher level. The main issue that most IT organizations have today when it comes to security is not remediating the vulnerability. Rather, it’s discovering the vulnerability in the first place. Interest in security intelligence wares is rapidly increasing across the IT spectrum. The challenge facing solution providers is developing an expertise in security intelligence in time to capitalize on that growing interest.

  • The company also announces new services and support as well as an expansion of its enterprise channel program.

  • A major challenge Symantec faces is quickly finding a CEO who can restore confidence while continuing to execute on the company's channel strategies.

  • Although interest in tablets is high at small and midsize businesses, a large number of users don't have access to them, and the majority of those who do are using devices their employers own, according to a survey of 300 IT professionals at SMBs. The study, conducted by Dimensional Research on behalf of desktop virtualization software specialist NComputing, suggests that, despite all the discussion about the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) trend, due to security issues, most SMB IT professionals are more comfortable with tablets when the company owns them. Of course, many of those tablet users are accessing applications and storage services that may not be sanctioned by their company's IT departments. The good news is that, regardless of the applications and services being used, the majority of those polled say mobile computing does make employees more productive. From a channel perspective, the major opportunity that tablets create is not necessarily in reselling devices. Rather, IT organizations are looking for help with—not only securing and managing these devices—but also building applications. Here are key findings from the NComputing study.

  • Google is asking IT security experts for their input in an online survey about how to make the Internet safer for consumers.

  • The cloud-based solutions give smaller companies and hosted service providers enterprise-level capabilities that are easy to use and inexpensive.

  • Identity thieves continue to focus on perceived easy money in tax identity fraud, requiring better security measures, says anti-fraud firm ThreatMetrix.

  • Eagle Eye Networks created a video surveillance system managed via the cloud and recently expanded its services to partners through its channel program.

  • Target, Neiman Marcus and other retailers have a responsibility to provide a trustworthy transaction system, but too often they are shortchanging their customers.

  • The range of mobile computing services for which enterprise IT organizations are looking outside their own organization is growing rapidly.