Cloud Computing's Nuances: Taking a Close Look

 
 
By Michael Vizard  |  Posted 2016-10-10 Email
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  • Previous
    1 - Cloud Computing's Nuances: Taking a Close Look
    Next

    Cloud Computing's Nuances: Taking a Close Look

    Sizing up the cloud maturity of a potential customer can be challenging. A CompTIA study provides insight into the cloud market's maturity.
  • Previous
    2 - A Work in Cloud Progress
    Next

    A Work in Cloud Progress

    More than 90% of companies are using some form of cloud computing. Yet only 33% say they are in full production while 8% say they have completely transformed their IT architectures. Another 38% say they are using the cloud for non-critical systems while 21% say they are still experimenting.
  • Previous
    3 - Cloud Application Usage
    Next

    Cloud Application Usage

    Not surprisingly, email (51%), followed by Web presence (46%) and business productivity (45%) top the list of application use cases for the cloud.
  • Previous
    4 - Cloud Models Employed
    Next

    Cloud Models Employed

    Nearly three-quarters (74%) are using SaaS applications. Another 42% are using infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) while 33% are using some form of a platform-as-a-service (PaaS) environment.
  • Previous
    5 - Cloud Locations Embraced
    Next

    Cloud Locations Embraced

    Nearly half (46%) say they have embraced private clouds only. Another 28% are using public clouds while 26% say they are using hybrid clouds.
  • Previous
    6 - Length of Cloud Use
    Next

    Length of Cloud Use

    Most respondents have been using cloud solutions between one and five years. Half have been using the cloud for one to three years; 21% have been using the cloud for three to five years; 6% say they have been using cloud solutions for more than five years; and 23% say they have been using the cloud for less than a year.
  • Previous
    7 - Drivers of Cloud Adoption
    Next

    Drivers of Cloud Adoption

    Larger organizations most often cited an ability to reduce costs as the biggest driver (47%). Smaller organization most often said the cloud was simply a better option (42%).
  • Previous
    8 - Watch Out for Shadow IT
    Next

    Watch Out for Shadow IT

    IT leaders estimate that business units funded the acquisition of technology from 26% to 54% of the time. While the IT department typically purchases apps used across the company, including virtual desktops and email, line-of-business professionals would be more apt to procure apps that a single department might use.
  • Previous
    9 - Drivers for Switching Clouds
    Next

    Drivers for Switching Clouds

    Better offerings/features (37%), security concerns (35%), cost (27%) and open standards (26%) were cited as the primary reason to make a move from one cloud to another. Nearly half (46%) said making the move to a secondary cloud was more difficult than moving to the first cloud.
  • Previous
    10 - Reasons for Moving Back to a Private Cloud
    Next

    Reasons for Moving Back to a Private Cloud

    Moves back to on-premise systems are primarily driven by security (58%), failure to achieve cost goals (30%), failure to integrate (24%) and dissatisfaction with reliability (22%).
  • Previous
    11 - New IT Skills Required in the Cloud
    Next

    New IT Skills Required in the Cloud

    Integration specialists (66%) and IT pros with an ability to build private clouds (63%) are the most sought after, followed closely by department liaisons (61%) and cloud architects (58%).
 

Although the cloud has been adopted widely, there are nuances in terms of how it actually is employed. The use of private clouds, however they are defined, continues to exceed the adoption of public clouds, suggests a new survey conducted by IT industry association CompTIA. At the same time, however, the use of software-as-a-service (SaaS) applications is off the chart. The survey, based on a poll of 500 IT and business professionals, finds that while there are a lot of good reasons to move between clouds, doing so can be difficult. The study confirms that organizations are most in need of integration specialists and IT professionals that have the skills to build a private cloud. For solution providers, cloud computing is clearly a game-changer—creating both digital disruption as well as major opportunities. The challenge lies in sizing up the cloud maturity of any given potential customer. Here Channel Insider examines key takeaways from the study.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Submit a Comment

Loading Comments...
 
























 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Thanks for your registration, follow us on our social networks to keep up-to-date